Anchor Bay’s Fantastic Teammates

On August 13, 2010, in Children's Ministry (Anchor Bay), by Children's Ministry

Anchor Bay is looking for several people to step in to volunteer in The Reef which are 3 year olds – 1st grade and The Cove 2nd-5th grade.  Training, fun, and friendship are part of the job!

You can fill out an application online or pick one up in the children’s area on Sunday morning or during the week. References will be checked and fingerprinting is required.

We think our volunteers are fantastic!  They are playing a huge role in the spiritual development of future generations. Come on board and become one of our Fantastic Teammates!  You will be blessed beyond belief!

If you need more information contact Reef Coordinator, Nikki Belanger at 831.383.0198 or Coordinator of The Cove, Norma Huey at 831.655.0100, x304 or 831.233.2604.

Anchor Bay is looking for several people to step in to volunteer in The Reef which are 3 year olds – 1st grade and The Cove 2nd-5th grade.  Training, fun, and friendship are part of the job!

You can fill out an application online or pick one up in the children’s area on Sunday morning or during the week. References will be checked and fingerprinting is required.

We think our volunteers are fantastic!  They are playing a huge role in the spiritual development of future generations. Come on board and become one of our Fantastic Teammates!  You will be blessed beyond belief!

If you need more information contact Reef Coordinator, Nikki Belanger at 831.383.0198 or Coordinator of The Cove, Norma Huey at 831.655.0100, x304 or 831.233.2604.

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Paid Child Care Staff Needed

On August 13, 2010, in Children's Ministry (Anchor Bay), by Children's Ministry

We are hiring right now for paid child care workers.  If you have a heart for children, this may be the job for you!  Positions for both day and evening events are available.  Please complete an application online or pick  one  up in the children’s office.  References will be checked.  Fingerprinting is also required. For more information, please contact Ilene Cashman or call 831.655.1470.

We are hiring right now for paid child care workers.  If you have a heart for children, this may be the job for you!  Positions for both day and evening events are available.  Please complete an application online or pick  one  up in the children’s office.  References will be checked.  Fingerprinting is also required. For more information, please contact Ilene Cashman or call 831.655.1470.

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Parenting Tip

On July 14, 2010, in Children's Ministry (Anchor Bay), by Children's Ministry

July 12, 2010

Teaching Children to Look for Ways to Help

One of the parts of our honor definition is that we do more than what’s expected. That means seeing what needs to be done and doing it. It means solving problems instead leaving them for others. One family had a sign in their kitchen that read:
If it’s broken, fix it.
If it’s empty, fill it up.
If it’s open, shut it.
If it’s out, put it away.
If it’s messy, clean it up.
If you can’t, then report it.
That’s honor.

Take time to teach children that they don’t have to be asked in order to do a job. Honor means that we’re all contributing to family life. In fact, you may ask a child to go around the house and look for one job that needs to be done and do it, then report back to you.

These kinds of discussions and exercises will help children think outside of their little box and discover that they have a responsibility to the family. They can contribute to family life by just seeing something that needs to be done and doing it.

Of course, that’s what makes a valuable employee too so you can teach your children something more important than just how to get along better in your family. You may be preparing them to be outstanding employees as they get older.

July 12, 2010

Teaching Children to Look for Ways to Help

One of the parts of our honor definition is that we do more than what’s expected. That means seeing what needs to be done and doing it. It means solving problems instead leaving them for others. One family had a sign in their kitchen that read:
If it’s broken, fix it.
If it’s empty, fill it up.
If it’s open, shut it.
If it’s out, put it away.
If it’s messy, clean it up.
If you can’t, then report it.
That’s honor.

Take time to teach children that they don’t have to be asked in order to do a job. Honor means that we’re all contributing to family life. In fact, you may ask a child to go around the house and look for one job that needs to be done and do it, then report back to you.

These kinds of discussions and exercises will help children think outside of their little box and discover that they have a responsibility to the family. They can contribute to family life by just seeing something that needs to be done and doing it.

Of course, that’s what makes a valuable employee too so you can teach your children something more important than just how to get along better in your family. You may be preparing them to be outstanding employees as they get older.

Parenting Tip

On June 23, 2010, in Children's Ministry (Anchor Bay), by Children's Ministry

Why a Bedtime is Important

One of the gifts parents can give their children is teaching and developing the character quality of self-discipline. With young children, in particular, bedtime is a good place to start. Children often don’t want to go to bed and the continual battle night after night is draining, causing many parents to just give up and allow children to stay up later.
A bedtime for children is good for them as well as for their parents. Enforcing it though, means extra work for a while. Here are some suggestions for working with young children to make bedtimes work more effectively.

1)    Start the bedtime routine earlier so that it doesn’t all get crammed into the last few minutes. If bedtime is 8:00 pm then start the routine at 7:30 by getting on pajamas and completing a bathroom routine. Then enjoy some relaxed time with children, reading or playing or just talking together.

2)    At bedtime, tuck each child in individually. Use this time to continue to debrief about the day in preparation for a good night sleep and pleasant dreams. You may pray, sing, and hug your child. Different families do different things to make it fun and meaningful.

3)    Enforce quietness. A child may not feel tired so lying quietly is all you need to require. You may have to sit in the doorway or just outside the door to make sure the child doesn’t get up, turn the light on, or start playing.

4)    If a child gets up or calls out. Quickly, calmly, and firmly, get the child back in bed with as little dialogue as possible. One dad was surprised to find that the first night he had to take his three-year-old son back to bed over 20 times. After a few days, though, he saw tremendous improvement. His son realized that bedtime was nonnegotiable.

5)    Hang in there, be consistent, and invest in the self-discipline development of your child. You and your children will benefit from the work you put into the process.

Bedtimes are opportunities to build relationship, but there comes a point where building self-discipline takes priority. Young children are happier and more pleasant to work with once they’ve learned self-discipline in their lives. It’s work but it’s worth it in the end.

Why a Bedtime is Important

One of the gifts parents can give their children is teaching and developing the character quality of self-discipline. With young children, in particular, bedtime is a good place to start. Children often don’t want to go to bed and the continual battle night after night is draining, causing many parents to just give up and allow children to stay up later.
A bedtime for children is good for them as well as for their parents. Enforcing it though, means extra work for a while. Here are some suggestions for working with young children to make bedtimes work more effectively.

1)    Start the bedtime routine earlier so that it doesn’t all get crammed into the last few minutes. If bedtime is 8:00 pm then start the routine at 7:30 by getting on pajamas and completing a bathroom routine. Then enjoy some relaxed time with children, reading or playing or just talking together.

2)    At bedtime, tuck each child in individually. Use this time to continue to debrief about the day in preparation for a good night sleep and pleasant dreams. You may pray, sing, and hug your child. Different families do different things to make it fun and meaningful.

3)    Enforce quietness. A child may not feel tired so lying quietly is all you need to require. You may have to sit in the doorway or just outside the door to make sure the child doesn’t get up, turn the light on, or start playing.

4)    If a child gets up or calls out. Quickly, calmly, and firmly, get the child back in bed with as little dialogue as possible. One dad was surprised to find that the first night he had to take his three-year-old son back to bed over 20 times. After a few days, though, he saw tremendous improvement. His son realized that bedtime was nonnegotiable.

5)    Hang in there, be consistent, and invest in the self-discipline development of your child. You and your children will benefit from the work you put into the process.

Bedtimes are opportunities to build relationship, but there comes a point where building self-discipline takes priority. Young children are happier and more pleasant to work with once they’ve learned self-discipline in their lives. It’s work but it’s worth it in the end.

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PARENTING TIP OF THE WEEK

On June 8, 2010, in Children's Ministry (Anchor Bay), by Children's Ministry

June 3, 2010

Some Kids Drain Energy Out of Family Life

Some children have the ability to suck the energy right out of family life. These children are demanding of your time, need a lot of correction, and seem to be magnets for conflict. They are often emotionally explosive but almost always drain the energy out of parents and other family members. Unfortunately then, these children develop a negative view of themselves based on the high amount of negative feedback they receive.
One solution is to teach them to add energy back into family life. We use the term “honor” to describe the process of thinking of others above yourself. If Jack seems to get people riled up each afternoon before dinner, set an appointment with him at 4:00 pm for several days in a row and ask him to look for three things he can do to add to family life. He may decorate the dinner table, encourage his brother, or prepare something nice for Dad’s arrival home.

If Jack continually antagonizes his sister, tell him that he needs to think of three nice things to do for her before he can go on with family life. Don’t tell him exactly what he needs to do. If you decide what Jack needs to do and tell him to do it, that’s obedience. When Jack chooses, that’s honor. Honor treats people as special and does more than what’s expected. Jack needs to learn how to add energy to family life instead of taking it away. Challenging children in this way helps them to think differently.

Teens need to learn honor because it will make them more successful in life. Hidden within honor are the secret ingredients that make people more productive in relationships. Teaching honor is worth the work, because honor changes people.

June 3, 2010

Some Kids Drain Energy Out of Family Life

Some children have the ability to suck the energy right out of family life. These children are demanding of your time, need a lot of correction, and seem to be magnets for conflict. They are often emotionally explosive but almost always drain the energy out of parents and other family members. Unfortunately then, these children develop a negative view of themselves based on the high amount of negative feedback they receive.
One solution is to teach them to add energy back into family life. We use the term “honor” to describe the process of thinking of others above yourself. If Jack seems to get people riled up each afternoon before dinner, set an appointment with him at 4:00 pm for several days in a row and ask him to look for three things he can do to add to family life. He may decorate the dinner table, encourage his brother, or prepare something nice for Dad’s arrival home.

If Jack continually antagonizes his sister, tell him that he needs to think of three nice things to do for her before he can go on with family life. Don’t tell him exactly what he needs to do. If you decide what Jack needs to do and tell him to do it, that’s obedience. When Jack chooses, that’s honor. Honor treats people as special and does more than what’s expected. Jack needs to learn how to add energy to family life instead of taking it away. Challenging children in this way helps them to think differently.

Teens need to learn honor because it will make them more successful in life. Hidden within honor are the secret ingredients that make people more productive in relationships. Teaching honor is worth the work, because honor changes people.

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